How to Write and Pass IELTS: What to Know Before Writing the Examination

How to Write and Pass IELTS: What to Know Before Writing the Examination
How to Write and Pass IELTS: What to Know Before Writing the Examination

Writing and Passing International English Language Testing System: The International English Language Testing System (IELTS) is an English language test required for migration, study, or employment in a country where English is the native language. It is a test that international candidates who want to work or study in a country where English is the primary language must take.

IELTS primarily evaluates a candidate’s ability to communicate in four basic English language skills: listening, reading, speaking, and writing. IDP Education Australia, the British Council, and Cambridge English Language Assessment jointly own and administer the test. The test is accepted by all universities in the United Kingdom and Australia, as well as 3,400 institutions in the United States and thousands more in English-speaking countries.

Why Write IELTS?

The International English Language Testing System is a standardized test used to evaluate the English language proficiency of non-native English speakers. There are several reasons why someone might choose to take the IELTS:

Education:

Many universities and colleges require international students to demonstrate a certain level of English language proficiency before they can be admitted to a degree program. Taking the IELTS is one way to demonstrate this proficiency.

Immigration:

Some countries require immigrants to demonstrate a certain level of English language proficiency before they can be granted a visa or residency. The International English Language Testing System is one of the tests that is commonly accepted for this purpose.

Employment:

Some employers may require job candidates to demonstrate a certain level of English language proficiency before they can be hired, particularly if the job involves interacting with customers or clients who speak English.

Personal development:

Some individuals may choose to take the IELTS as a way to improve their English language skills and gain confidence in using the language.

READ: How to Ace the IELTS Listening Test by Improving Your Listening Skills

Types of IELTS

There are two types of IELTS exams: the Academic IELTS and the General Training IELTS.

Academic IELTS:

This exam is designed for individuals who plan to study at the undergraduate or postgraduate level, or for those seeking professional registration in an English-speaking environment. The Academic IELTS measures English language proficiency in academic contexts, such as reading and writing academic texts, listening to lectures, and participating in academic discussions.

General Training IELTS:

This exam is designed for individuals who plan to work or migrate to an English-speaking country. The General Training IELTS measures English language proficiency in practical, everyday contexts, such as reading and writing emails, listening to instructions, and participating in general conversations.

Both the Academic and General Training IELTS consist of four parts: Listening, Reading, Writing, and Speaking. The Listening and Speaking sections are the same for both exams, while the Reading and Writing sections are different. The Reading and Writing sections of the Academic IELTS are more academically focused, while the Reading and Writing sections of the General Training IELTS are more practical and everyday focused.

IELTS Testing Pattern/ Timing

The IELTS test consists of four sections: Listening, Reading, Writing, and Speaking. The total test time is 2 hours and 45 minutes. Here’s a breakdown of the timing and format for each section:

Listening (30 minutes):

You will listen to four recordings of native English speakers and answer a series of questions. The recordings may include conversations, monologues, or discussions. There are 40 questions in total.

Reading (60 minutes):

You will read three passages and answer a series of questions. The passages may be academic or general in nature. There are 40 questions in total.

Writing (60 minutes):

You will complete two writing tasks. Task 1 requires you to describe and explain data, diagrams, or processes. Task 2 requires you to write an essay in response to a prompt.

Speaking (11-14 minutes):

You will have a face-to-face interview with a certified IELTS examiner. The interview will consist of three parts. In Part 1, you will be asked general questions about yourself and your interests. In Part 2, you will be given a topic to talk about for two minutes. In Part 3, you will discuss the topic further with the examiner.

It’s important to note that the Listening, Reading, and Writing sections are all completed on the same day, usually in the morning, with no breaks in between. The Speaking section may be completed on the same day as the other sections or up to seven days before or after the other sections.

RECOMMENDED: Funded British Council Free Online IELTS Preparation Courses

conclusion:

The key to passing an exam or test is adequate preparation and arming yourself with the necessary information. There are two ways to prepare for IELTS: self-study and coaching classes. Your choice of engagement method will be heavily influenced by your language proficiency and level of comfort. Some people, however, may choose to use both approaches. You must be honest with yourself in order to determine which one works best for you.

For more information visit official website.

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